Originally posted on The Fall of Albion:
Last week, University College London publicly released a database that allows users to look up the names of people who were reimbursed by the British government for the slaves they owned after Britain banned slavery in 1833. It has touched off a debate over how to think about…

Rethinking 1960s British Cinema-going

Spend a moment imagining a busy street in 1960s Britain. What does it look like? What does it sound like? What are people wearing? For many, the street will be full of women in miniskirts and men in flares. The colours will be vivid and the sound of the Beatles or the Rolling Stones will…

Originally posted on Adam I. P. Smith: Historian:
The much-gossiped about new draft national curriculum for history has finally been published. It’s only six-and-a-half pages and is simply a list of stuff that’s happened in English history. Rightly, prominent historians have condemned it for its ‘little England’, facts-over-context character. Unlike some, I have no problem…

After the PhD

People often ask me what I plan to do after I finish studying history. “What, you know, JOB, will you get?” they say. That’s not just people who don’t know me well or polite strangers making conversation; even one of my uncles asked me back when I started my undergraduate degree, “You’re going to be,…

A Reagan-Era Champion of Human Rights

The Reagan administration’s record on human rights remains highly contested because its commitment was never universal but rather distorted by the ideological competition of the Cold War.  Specifically, during Reagan’s presidency, human rights violations in countries seen as anti-communist bulwarks – South Africa, Nicaragua, and South Korea – were largely overlooked while at the same…